Stories on herbal care & health

Sep. 24, 2020

I usually just enjoy photographing this aster, however;
Per Jim McDonald, the dried blossoms were also snuffed for similar purposes, or the vapor inhaled as a steam.

Aster tea was used to treat earache, relieve gas pains, stomach aches, & fevers. The flowers and roots were both commonly used.
I do love the Asters.

Be well, my Aster loving friends, jonnie dee, the #herbalrealestateagent
#tsht #herbalrealestateagent #jonniedee #harmonyrealtygroup #prettypictures

Sep. 20, 2020

Goldenrod...a great herb for tea, salve, a bath soak, oil or tincture...
Pick your Goldenrod, hang it upside down to dry. When it's dry, cut and clip it and then it's ready to do any of the above.

Store in your favorite jars or ziplock bags.

She has a wonderful spicy scent and it makes a great tea; So many health benefits.

Ps...she is given a bad rap for being an allergen when it is usually ragweed that blooms at the same time. Goldenrod actually helps most people with their allergy issues.
However; just remember, yes, yes, you can do it!

#findanherbstudyituseitloveitandshareit
Be well, jonnie dee #tsht #herbalrealestateagent #jonniedee #harmonyrealtygroup #prettypictures #goldenrod #herbsweedsandwanderings #herbwoman #healthyliving #herbs

Sep. 16, 2020
Did ya know??....that other marigolds besides the calendula marigold are also useful?
 
Use the petals and not the center or the greens. The petals are used in salads, rice, soups, eggs, quiche and other dishes. Some use it as an inexpensive replacement for the saffron spice.

Used fresh or dried. It's usually not the bigger share of the dish because they can be bitter. Most people like the tagetes marigold as the better of the bunch. Taste for yourself. Although we could use a little bit more of the bitter foods in our diet.

If you do an internet search for the marigold flower essence meaning, the tagetes is the first one that appears. Try making a flower essence from the flowers.

A essential oil from the tagetes is also sold online. They are pretty in a homemade potpourri too.🌼

So...move over calendula marigold, because there is room for all marigolds in the foraging kingdom.

#findanherbstudyituseitloveitandshareit #tsht
I'm loving orange... Be adventurous, my friends, much love, jonnie dee #tsht #herbalrealestateagent #jonniedee #marigold #flowerpower #orange

 

Sep. 14, 2020
Also called Sambucol at your local pharmacy...
Looking to build your immune system and prevent colds, flu and virus...
 
She's a pretty good plant ally...

My son spoke to me about the coronavirus yesterday and I told him that we could beef up our arsenal of herbal allies and make our bodies more resilient.

I'm not saying that our wild and weedy herbs are a miracle worker but they certainly can give us the edge we may need to keep us healthy.

 

Jul. 26, 2020

Did you know?...that one of my top garden flowers for years was the lovely echinacea/purple coneflower. Many of you have it in your gardens. It always surprises me when I share that it makes a great flower tea for the cold and flu season that the person didn't know about any of the benefits. In the early days of learning herbs it was one of the first herbs that I learned to use and very gratifying to pull out the dusty pink petals and leaves and brew healthy tea to shorten the duration of a cold or flu.

In those days it was hard to find information and confirmation that I could use the flower heads and leaves. Now with the internet you can find so much information.

However, I am here as a reminder or to share new information with you.

In today's picture I have taken dried and fresh echinacea flowers and leaves and have put them in my loosely packed jar and filled it with 100 proof vodka.

I shall leave it for 6-8 weeks and it should be done just in time for the cold and flu season.

You can infuse the echinacea in vinegar and honey to make an oxymel if you don't want to use alcohol. It's easy to do and many of you have this lovely flowering herb in your garden.

For an infusion or tea, you can use fresh or dried flowers to make tea. Cut the stems in about 8-12 inch lengths and bundle 6-10 stems together with a string or rubber band and hang upside down to dry. After dried, separate from the stem and put in a ziplock or mason jar for future use. I use approximately a few tablespoons of herb or a large flower head and a few leaves for a cup of tea or two, steeping for 15 minutes.

Please share with me if you already do this and what experiences you've had or how you use it. I would love to hear if you are going to try it for the first time. It's a great time to learn a few basics on how to give your body an immune system boost.

Be well, my friends, much love, jonnie dee #tsht #herbalrealestateagent #jonniedee #wildcrafting #eattheweeds #touchsomeoneshearttoday #harmonyrealtygroup #nwohiorealtor #jonniewagner #herbsweedsandwanderings